Last edited by Akimi
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

6 edition of Teaching high-school students to read found in the catalog.

Teaching high-school students to read

a study of retardation in reading

by Stella S. Center

  • 348 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by D. Appleton-Century Company, incorporated in New York, London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • New York. Theodore Roosevelt High School,
  • Reading, Psychology of,
  • Eye -- Movements

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Stella S. Center and Gladys L. Persons. A publication of the National Council of Teachers of English.
    SeriesEnglish, monograph no. 6
    ContributionsPersons, Gladys L., joint author, National Council of Teachers of English.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBF456.R2 C4
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, 167 p. incl. tables, diagrs.
    Number of Pages167
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6359565M
    LC Control Number37027435
    OCLC/WorldCa1115440

      Rationales like “We’ve always used that book” or “We have copies of it” or “It doesn’t really fit, but the kids like it” are not good-enough reasons to keep a text. Instead, as much as possible, let’s make thoughtful, purposeful decisions . Teaching Children to Read A report by the National Reading Panel on key skills and teaching methods central to reading achievement in grades K Provides a foundation from which to assess the unique needs of adolescent readers and then set rigorous guidelines for evaluating research on high school reading models and literacy interventions.

    To improve students' reading comprehension, teachers should introduce the seven cognitive strategies of effective readers: activating, inferring, monitoring-clarifying, questioning, searching-selecting, summarizing, and visualizing-organizing. This article includes definitions of the seven strategies and a lesson-plan template for teaching each one. Whether you read the following for a school assignment or just for leisure, here are a 15 must read books you should read before you graduate high school!

      Freshman Year & Other Unnatural Disasters by Meredith Zeitlin –We read so many serious stories in high school that I like to mix it up and read something funny out loud when I get the chance. Kelsey is hilarious and just a fun character to read. This is a pretty clean book as well which I always appreciate. The last decade has seen a renewed focus on improving the content writing skills of middle and high school students. A new Educator’s Practice Guide was just published in November, by the IES (Institute of Education Sciences) titled Teaching Secondary Students to Write Effectively.. This report presents writing instruction recommendations aligned with several earlier research .


Share this book
You might also like
The spirit of calligraphy.

The spirit of calligraphy.

Honor card & other poems

Honor card & other poems

Global Change Research Program, North American Landscape Characterization (NALC)

Global Change Research Program, North American Landscape Characterization (NALC)

Essays on The Welfare State.

Essays on The Welfare State.

Holborn

Holborn

Mastering Turbo Assembler

Mastering Turbo Assembler

Alexandrian Christianity

Alexandrian Christianity

New regional development paradigms.

New regional development paradigms.

Magnetic resonance of CoCr₂O₄ and MnCr₂O₄

Magnetic resonance of CoCr₂O₄ and MnCr₂O₄

outline of bacteriology and immunity.

outline of bacteriology and immunity.

Eero Saarinen

Eero Saarinen

Roteiro da I Exposic̜ão teatral portuguesa.

Roteiro da I Exposic̜ão teatral portuguesa.

Virginias Constitutional Convention of 1901-1902

Virginias Constitutional Convention of 1901-1902

We are not afraid

We are not afraid

An introduction to animal behavior

An introduction to animal behavior

Teaching high-school students to read by Stella S. Center Download PDF EPUB FB2

Discussing the problems of high school teaching. Most of the complaints seemed to center on reading. "The reading problem is so bad," said one social studies teacher, "that I no longer make any reading assign ments.

It is useless. Most of the. Teens today expect instant, easy answers thanks to the internet. But I wanted my high school students to love reading, so I threw out my traditional teaching plans and we’re winging it : Dina Ley. A mini-lesson and anchor chart for showing early elementary students how to monitor their comprehension as they read.

Comprehension is, of course, the whole point of reading. As proficient readers read, they make meaning, learn new information, connect with characters, and enjoy the author’s craft. But as students begin to transition in their Author: Brooke Mackenzie. Teachers should not repeat the content students were asked to read in a class lecture.

Instead, they should support students to work with and apply the ideas in the text. Teaching Students to Self-Monitor for Understanding. Our approach to helping students learn self-monitoring is fairly : Sheila Valencia.

One of the most critical needs in Florida's Reading First schools is to improve the effectiveness of interventions for struggling readers. For example, during the school year, only 17% of first grade students who began the year at some level of risk for reading difficulties finished the year with grade level skills on the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS.

In60% of high school seniors reported that they read a newspaper, magazine or book on a daily basis for pleasure; by that number had dropped to 16%. Teenagers are more likely to read Author: Jeremy Adams.

Encouraging students to read has always been a challenge for me. But as an English language arts teacher for many years, I've learned a few tricks to help my students uncover the joys of reading for pleasure.

I've discovered that encouraging them to read becomes much easier when I have the right books on : Nancy Barile. Dear High School Students, Greetings. A few years ago I wrote an open letter to ninth graders about college readiness, trying to provide beginning high school students with a college professor’s perspective on what being ready for college really means (see “An Open Letter to Ninth Graders” in the January–February issue of Academe).As it turns out, “being ready”.

A Center for Teaching and Learning survey identified the 10 most commonly taught texts in high school; was a long time ago.

Even the “big kids” like a good ol’ read-aloud every once in a while, so you might be surprised to see how engaged (and interested!) your high schoolers become when you use one of these picture books for high school English class this year. It’s all about mixing things up and keeping things fresh when you’re teaching.

The book starts with seven essays by high school teachers about exciting, exemplary experiences they have had reading books with students in the classroom-from Dorothy Allison's Bastard Out of Carolina to Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon to Aeschylus's Oresteia trilogy/5(4).

I took *zero* classes in college or graduate school that focused on reading with high school students. I think the assumption is that older students can read, and we secondary teachers should delve into texts – analyzing, critiquing, examining.

Kids who struggle with reading can face new challenges when they reach middle school and high school. Reading methods based on research can help teens read more skillfully. There are strategies for teaching decoding and vocabulary skills to teens. Even when they’ve mastered the basics, kids who struggle with reading can feel new frustration Author: Ginny Osewalt.

But Paul W. Hankins, who teaches 11th grade English at Silver Creek High School in Sellersburg, Ind., sees reading aloud as an equalizer for students who will Author: Mary Ann Zehr.

Resources for High School Sociology. DC, on June 22 and The goal of the workshop is to promote the value of sociology for high school teachers and students by developing ready to use, high-quality teaching and learning resources that align with the National Standards for High School Sociology.

Read the High School Listserv posting. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Center, Stella S. (Stella Stewart), Teaching high-school students to read. New York, London, D. Appleton. If you were 16 again and ordered by teachers to read this summer, what titles would you be unlocking on your Kindle or Nook.

Think The Hunger Games, not The Great Gatsby, and The Help, not The 's high school reading lists lean toward popular contemporary books and away from the canonical titles that are more likely to be studied Author: Austin O'connor. Teaching High School English Literature Teaching high school English literature means casting a wide net, from the Middle Ages to contemporary American writing.

We’ve found Web sites that fully utilize the Internet to help keep your students engaged no. Students who have dyslexia, or another reading disability, often struggle integrating reading into their day-to-day lives.

Teachers and parents need to find fun and exciting ways to get the students to read without the student worrying that they will struggle. There are several great reading strategies for special education students.

Use this helpful guide as your personal mentor to achieve a successful and satisfying career as a high school teacher. Earn straight A's your first year by knowing how to: Create an attention-grabbing and interactive teaching environment Manage difficult students and /5(28). Encouraging students to direct questions to the writer helps them go beyond information seeking to analysis of ideas.

Bart Pollard at Cottage Grove High School in Oregon nudged his learners to this level as they read Edgar Allan Poe's essay "The Philosophy of Composition." Notice that they address the author directly in the following questions.High school students today are reading books intended for children with reading levels far below those appropriate for teens, according to a recent report.

A compilation of the top 40 books teens in grades are reading in school shows that the average reading level of that list is -- barely above the fifth grade.An Open Letter to High School Students about Reading Dear High School Students, Greetings!

A few years ago I wrote an open letter to ninth graders about college readiness, trying to provide beginning high school students with a college professor’s perspective on what being ready for college really means (see “An Open Letter to Ninth Graders.